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    • #7616
      Les EllsworthLes Ellsworth
      Participant

      When you look at the origin of the FCL and how they started, the retails that survived were often those with the most effective management. In this case study, it is evident that they were facing some very difficult times within (unrest with retails) and the changing dynamics in the market place and competition. The FCL had to look at their branding, advertising, wholesaling and communication strategy compared to the competition. They had come to a crossroads and needed to do a rebranding along with support across the retailing system.

      I would recommend that FCL call a special meeting with all retails after surveying the retails for input moving forward. No retail should be given autonomy in decision making in the overall direction that the FCL needed to move towards. The FCL along with the local retails should charter a course updating their branding, advertising, wholesaling and communicate with all members the direction that they are moving in. Look to the retail coops with strong management to promote and help the weaker coops. The communication is vital to all retails and don’t change direction in mid stream. It will be either success or failure. At a local level we hold an annual meeting with our board to evaluate our local retail and decide by vote on projects moving forward we need to do to meet the needs of our members. We then communicate this at the next annual meeting. This is then communicated through the General Manager to staff in a meeting. We use board meetings, staff meetings and sometimes social media to get the message out to members and the pubLic when needed.

      3+
    • #8030
      James MacFarlaneJames MacFarlane
      Participant

      What is interesting in Les’s comments is the role of communication. No matter what the plan or strategy, having effective strong communication helps keep membership informed. Staying silent or not responding allows competitors to get a leg up on you and it is hard to regain trust and commitment. Keep membership well informed and allow for meaningful input.

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    • #8032
      Jen BudneyJen Budney
      Participant

      Great comments, Les and James. Communication is indeed key. What more could FCL do in this scenario to bring members of the CRS together in a time of crisis? What if there are conflicting ideas coming from the locals? How would/should FCL create consensus in this scenario? Without consensus, there is the risk of some locals feeling like they are being dictated to by others (or by FCL itself).

      1+
    • #8034
      Walter PreugschasWalter Preugschas
      Participant

      As stated in this section, a very crucial part of communication is listening. FCL has to adopt extreme corporate listening. Generally speaking, when people are truly heard they will feel part of the entity, in this case FCL, and they will be much more inclined to buy into the group decision.

      1+
    • #8035
      Kathy LittleKathy Little
      Participant

      The message that needs to be developed and communicated with the local retails and FCL is of a shared vision and goals. Focusing on strategic interdependencies of the organizations.

      1+
    • #8050
      Randy GrahamRandy Graham
      Participant

      As stated by other’s communication is certainly key but it’s also the subject of that communication that is truly important.
      In the scenario, remaining together as a unified buying group adds value to everyone. But for FCL it needs to be or remain relevant to the retail member owners and it needs to define through these owners what that relevancy looks like. Together this could include a broader rebranding program to establishing retail strategic planning formats that assist the struggling retails to assisting with marketing strategies within regional and smaller district areas. It really comes down to those honest discussions with the member owners which will allow each to achieve success as individuals.

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    • #8052
      Mary NirlungayukMary Nirlungayuk
      Participant

      CRS has a broad base membership large membership and small members, it could meets its members by having dealing with large, medium and small size CSR and be able to do their Marketing Plan successfully.

      perhaps consultation with the membership and perhaps this is already being done.

      1+
    • #8057
      Jen BudneyJen Budney
      Participant

      Thanks, everyone. Some very good points here. Yes, FCL does have an important role in defining – and then persuading – its members towards a shared vision and understanding of relevance. The definition, of course, is arrived at by actively listening to all the members and understanding their experiences and concerns.

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    • #8118
      Tina NgoTina Ngo
      Participant

      In a time like this, we all need to support each other and no one is left behind. We’re in it together. Having an open dialog and open communication is key. Stay focus, stay strong!

      1+
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